People Stuggle to Eat Healthy

People Stuggle to Eat Healthy
Brian Clancey

Most people struggle to eat throughout the day and
at each meal, according to results of an Ipsos-Reid poll for
’s ’s Choice label.

The poll found 94% say they just can’t live without a favorite
food, while 7% concede they almost never make healthy food
choices.

“Canadians want food choices that help make it easier to eat
better and live healthier without giving up the foods and
flavors they love,” says Paul , Vice President, Brands
Limited. Most surveyed do understand the importance of reducing
the of their diets and increasing fiber, Uys
noted.

These results “suggest they’re not eating as well as they could
because of their must-have meals,” say officials at Presidents
Choice. “In fact, 59% say they’d like to eat healthier but don’t
want to give up their favorite foods, with 40% citing comfort
foods like or pizza as real weaknesses.”

Finding Time a Priority — Doing It Hard

Despite these findings, the survey found people know it’s
important to eat well. Roughly 82% say finding the time to
prepare and eat healthy meals is a priority, yet half still find
it difficult to make .

“There are a number of other perceived barriers to healthy
habits other than favorite foods that may explain why eating
well can be a challenge,” Presidents Choice said in discussing
the survey results. “Time of day certainly seems to be a factor,
with more than 80% of Canadians finding it hard to eat properly
at some point.”

A quarter find it hard to eat during the day,
with 30% of woman falling prey to temptation, compared to 17% of
the men surveyed. Men, by contrast, struggle with breakfast,
with 24% saying they do not start their day with a healthy
breakfast, compared to 17% of women. This works out to 21%
finding it hard to eat a healthy breakfast. Fewer people have a
problem eating healthy meals the . Even so,
eating a healthy lunch is a problem for 16% of people surveyed
and 15% find supper a struggle.

Cost, taste, and choice

The perceived cost, taste and overwhelming number of choices
when it comes to healthier also seem to be
barriers for many. In fact, 60% feel that the costs of eating
healthfully have increased, while 54% say their family would eat
more healthfully if the nutritious options tasted better.
Furthermore, 59% indicate they can be confused by the many
different things they’re supposed to look out for when shopping
for healthy foods.

“Canadians do recognize that specific foods are important in
achieving a well-balanced diet,” says Uys. “Interestingly
enough, the Healthy Eating survey found that 68% think it’s
important to incorporate sodium-reduced foods into their diet,
and 58% of younger Canadians aged 18-34 agree with this
statement. This is an age group that typically loves their salty
foods, so the fact that they’re aware that it’s important to
choose foods that offer responsible sodium levels is
encouraging.”

About 40% of those surveyed would like to incorporate more fibre
into their diet, but find it difficult. “There are so many great
and easy ways to add fibre to your diet – yogurt with a
high-fibre muffin and a handful of almonds is a perfect
breakfast to take on the go,” says Uys.

The Joy of Soy

The Healthy Eating survey found that just 29% of Canadians
incorporate soy protein into their diet on a regular basis.
While overall, soy is just one component of healthy eating
towards lowering cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk,
evidence continues to be strong on the benefit of soy protein
compared to animal protein sources.

Not only is soy a great source of vegetable protein and so low
in saturated fat – but many soy foods can be a source of omega-3
polyunsaturated fatty acids and a good source of calcium.
Despite this, 27% of Canadians feel they get enough protein from
other sources; 25% aren’t familiar with soy protein; 20% say
they’re not interested; 18% don’t like the taste; 13% don’t know
how to incorporate it into their daily diet; and five% don’t
know how much they should eat.

Nutritionists recommend consuming 25 grams of soy protein each
day – about eight grams per meal. “When you consider that just
one glass of PC Soy Beverage contains about a third of your
daily requirement, it’s easy to swallow,” says Uys.

Resources

Rachael Ray’s
30-Minute Get Real Meals

About the author:

Brian Clancey has a long standing interest in health and an
active lifestyle. This was the inspiration behind creation of
the http://www.thehealthyweb.com< /a> website, offering daily recipes and discussion of food and
health issues.

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