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People Stuggle to Eat Healthy

People Stuggle to Eat Healthy
Brian Clancey

Most people struggle to eat healthy foods throughout the day and
at each meal, according to results of an Ipsos-Reid poll for
Canada’s President’s Choice label.

The poll found 94% say they just can’t live without a favorite
food, while 7% concede they almost never make healthy food
choices.

“Canadians want food choices that help make it easier to eat
better and live healthier without giving up the foods and
flavors they love,” says Paul Uys, Vice President, Loblaw Brands
Limited. Most surveyed do understand the importance of reducing
the salt content of their diets and increasing fiber, Uys
noted.

These results “suggest they’re not eating as well as they could
because of their must-have meals,” say officials at Presidents
Choice. “In fact, 59% say they’d like to eat healthier but don’t
want to give up their favorite foods, with 40% citing comfort
foods like macaroni and cheese or pizza as real weaknesses.”

Finding Time a Priority — Doing It Hard

Despite these findings, the survey found people know it’s
important to eat well. Roughly 82% say finding the time to
prepare and eat healthy meals is a priority, yet half still find
it difficult to make healthy food choices.

“There are a number of other perceived barriers to healthy
habits other than favorite foods that may explain why eating
well can be a challenge,” Presidents Choice said in discussing
the survey results. “Time of day certainly seems to be a factor,
with more than 80% of Canadians finding it hard to eat properly
at some point.”

A quarter find it hard to eat healthy snacks during the day,
with 30% of woman falling prey to temptation, compared to 17% of
the men surveyed. Men, by contrast, struggle with breakfast,
with 24% saying they do not start their day with a healthy
breakfast, compared to 17% of women. This works out to 21%
finding it hard to eat a healthy breakfast. Fewer people have a
problem eating healthy meals the rest of the day. Even so,
eating a healthy lunch is a problem for 16% of people surveyed
and 15% find supper a struggle.

Cost, taste, and choice

The perceived cost, taste and overwhelming number of choices
when it comes to healthier food products also seem to be
barriers for many. In fact, 60% feel that the costs of eating
healthfully have increased, while 54% say their family would eat
more healthfully if the nutritious options tasted better.
Furthermore, 59% indicate they can be confused by the many
different things they’re supposed to look out for when shopping
for healthy foods.

“Canadians do recognize that specific foods are important in
achieving a well-balanced diet,” says Uys. “Interestingly
enough, the Healthy Eating survey found that 68% think it’s
important to incorporate sodium-reduced foods into their diet,
and 58% of younger Canadians aged 18-34 agree with this
statement. This is an age group that typically loves their salty
foods, so the fact that they’re aware that it’s important to
choose foods that offer responsible sodium levels is
encouraging.”

About 40% of those surveyed would like to incorporate more fibre
into their diet, but find it difficult. “There are so many great
and easy ways to add fibre to your diet – yogurt with a
high-fibre muffin and a handful of almonds is a perfect
breakfast to take on the go,” says Uys.

The Joy of Soy

The Healthy Eating survey found that just 29% of Canadians
incorporate soy protein into their diet on a regular basis.
While overall, soy is just one component of healthy eating
towards lowering cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk,
evidence continues to be strong on the benefit of soy protein
compared to animal protein sources.

Not only is soy a great source of vegetable protein and so low
in saturated fat – but many soy foods can be a source of omega-3
polyunsaturated fatty acids and a good source of calcium.
Despite this, 27% of Canadians feel they get enough protein from
other sources; 25% aren’t familiar with soy protein; 20% say
they’re not interested; 18% don’t like the taste; 13% don’t know
how to incorporate it into their daily diet; and five% don’t
know how much they should eat.

Nutritionists recommend consuming 25 grams of soy protein each
day – about eight grams per meal. “When you consider that just
one glass of PC Soy Beverage contains about a third of your
daily requirement, it’s easy to swallow,” says Uys.

Resources

Rachael Ray’s
30-Minute Get Real Meals

About the author:

Brian Clancey has a long standing interest in health and an
active lifestyle. This was the inspiration behind creation of
the http://www.thehealthyweb.com< /a> website, offering daily recipes and discussion of food and
health issues.


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Nutrition, Evolution, and Having a Healthy Diet

Nutrition, Evolution, and Having a Healthy Diet
Judith Schwader

Nutrition has everything to do with health. This isnt news, exactly, but looking around at the crazy information on the market, one wonders if anyone actually makes the connection: what you eat affects how you feel. Its that simple. Your health depends on the food choices you make in both the short and long term.

Take a pill, and all youve done is treat a symptom. Change your eating habits, and create a lasting change in your well-being. There are so many approaches to eating, however, and so much conflicting information that its come down to this simple question: does whatever youre eating right now make sense?

Well, sense isnt common, and it does depend on some good information. So here is something to consider: what kind of foods are humans evolved to eat? Cheetos? Dont think so. Thats a no-brainer, but what about some others that we counted as healthy staples until recently, like bread and pasta. Go way back in your imagination, to hunter gatherer days before agriculture and the obesity which followed for the first time among humans and consider what would be part of our ancestors normal diet. If youre about to pop something into your mouth that wasnt around before agriculture, (a relatively recent development in human history), then eat it knowing its not considered a normal food by your body. Foods your body considers normal contribute to your health, other foods are either neutral or harmful. How simple is that?

A well-known exploration of this concept that certain foods help our bodies thrive is Dr. Peter DAdamos book, Eat Right 4 Your Type, in which he bases his lists of what to eat and avoid on blood type. DAdamo asserts that type O is the oldest type, and the newer A type didnt show up on the scene until agriculture. So, Os should eat lots of meat and veg because that blood type doesnt know how to handle too much grain. Type As can eat grain, but not dairy. Dairy is a category reserved as a normal food only for the yet more recent human blood type, AB. (Maybe well evolve a new type that can handle Cheetos and red licorice, my personal favorite abnormal foods).

DAdamo supports his blood-type theory with all kinds of careful research, and so what? Does it make sense that humans should rely primarily on foods that occur naturally? Absolutely. If youre going to eat a grain like wheat then, eat it whole, or dont eat it at all, and dont eat much of it anyway because humans pretty much made wheat up! Im not going to take the, Does it occur naturally? debate too far, because its time to look at another researchers take on the food and evolution connection.

Dr. Phillip Lipetz wrote The Good Calorie Diet, a book for the weight loss market, but he also has supported his theories with all kinds of careful research. His describes how the human response to starvation that was developed during the ice age carries on today. Ironic, isnt it, that the food available to us today – rich and sweet and abundant – causes our bodies to behave as though starvation is at hand.

The short story for how this works is that up until the ice age, humans ate whatever was readily available, like roots, plants, fruit, and a little tasty carrion now and then. Along came the ice ages, and those foods became scarce. Now humans were forced to hunt, but it was dicey and the weapons were primitive, so spans of time occured between kills. The result: our ancestors evolved ways to make the most of the conversion of excess blood sugar into stored nutrition in the form of body fat. When they starved, they lived off stored fat.

Todays diet mimics the ice age diet: high fat and high protein, and our genetic programming says, Uh oh, were facing starvation again. Better store up some fat. Lipetz goes into convincing detail about food combinations in his book. He describes some that cause the creation of excess fat, such as butter on bread. More useful are his combinations that actually inhibit fat formation, like lean meat with most vegetables. In a society where obesity and its attendant health issues are rampant, these food combinations are helpful places to focus our attention. Yet the single most useful bit to remember from his research is that foods which cause our bodies to create excess fat all have one thing in common: they werent part of our ancestors normal diet.

Armed with this overview, next time youre about to pop something in your mouth – whether your focus is health or weight you dont need to have a bunch of rules and whacky information in mind. Just use common sense. Ask whether its a food that was around before the advent of agriculture. If it was, go for it. If it wasnt, then consider that your body wont consider the food normal, and in both the long and short run, thats got health consequences.

© 2004 Judith Schwader

Judith Schwader holds a Master’s degree in Education, and has written extensively on health. She has a background in social science and addressing chronic health conditions through nutrition and life style. Judith’s articles appear in: http://QandAHealth.com, and http://masteringyourtime.com.

This article may be reprinted in its entirety so long as this paragraph and the authors credits remain intact.


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How To Eat A Healthy Diet When You Don’t

How To Eat A Healthy Diet When You Don’t Want To
Jeannie Crabtree

How To Eat A Healthy Diet When You Don’t Want To
By Jeannie Crabtree

For some people it is really hard to give up the junk food and sweets and eat a better, more nutritious diet. So let’s use the example of eating the 5 to 9 fruits and vegetables we need daily.

There are ways to work with your mind so that it becomes much easier and more enjoyable to eat all those servings of vegetables we need each day.

Did you know that you think in pictures?

You are motivated by the things that you want to move away from that might cause emotions you dont want such as pain, grief, anger etc. Examples: Ill health, overweight, not being able to join your family due to sickness is certainly things you want to move away from.

You are also motivated by the things you want to move towards. Emotions that would go with this are feeling happy, satisfied, loved, forgiven, respected, etc.

Move away from or move towards. These two ways you are motivated are the key to help you get past your dislike of vegetables and fruit if that is the problem .

Decide which type you are. Which are you most motivated by? Do you put moving away foremost in your mind or moving toward?

Ready to Start? Grab some vegetables. Look at them, feel them taste them, Chew on them. Snap them, break them up and hear the crunchiness. Involve as many of your senses as you can.

While doing that, do one of two things:

If motivated by what you are moving away from:

Paint the picture of what you are leaving behind. Accentuate the problems. Make them look really big and bad in your picture. Show your self what the big bad picture would be like a year from now or 5 years from now if you continued eating your bad diet. Put a lot of feeling into this.

If motivated by what you are moving towards:

Paint a big bright picture of what you will look like and feel like when you have better health. Think about who you love, who loves you and what you want to do and could do when you have good health.

Maybe you are not sure where you fit in to this process. Then play both pictures for yourself. Really put some pictures in your head. Use plenty of color. Turn the sound up.

Now which did you feel more motivated to eat the vegetables you need?

Play this picture over and over again as you eat the right foods, especially your vegetables and this will help you stay on track for better food choices.
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Jeannie Crabtree C.Ac. shares health answers that work, tips, nutrition suggestions and research in her newsletter and health blog. http://www.health-doc.com


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Healthy Eating Tips For Busy Women

Healthy Eating Tips For Busy Women
Phil Beckett

Healthy Eating Tips For Busy Women
By Phil Beckett

The following healthy eating tips will help you feel great, look great, carry out every-day activities better and empower you to keep it up for many years to come.

Poor health for most women is the build up of poor life-long nutrition choices and the lack of exercise, both cardiovascular and weight exercise. If you make good choices now and exercise on a regular basis, you’re less likely to become a strain on the health system years later.

And its been proven over and over for many years that women who do make these good choices tend to be healthier and live longer.

Youve probably heard most nutritionists say that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. And it is because if you eat breakfast youll not only gain fuel for a high-energy and productive day, but youll also have a tendency to make better food choices during the remainder of the day.

The mistake most women make when making a choice for breakfast is to just eat cereal. And it doesnt help with all of the commercials out their telling us that cereal is all you need.

Yes, cereals rich in fiber like bran flakes, oat bran, all-bran, and raisin bran are very healthy for you. And most types of cereal with a banana, strawberries, low-fat milk etc are very good for you.

But it’s important to know that while they may contain ample carbohydrates, calcium, fiber, other nutrients, are low in fat and easy and quick to make, they dont contain nearly enough protein.

And its the protein thats more than likely the missing ingredient in your diet.

Your muscles need protein, and cannot function properly without it. Women who attempt to lose fat and/or tone up their muscles, will get the best results when they consume an ample amount of protein with breakfast.
But it difficult to get good quality protein during breakfast, unless you were to eat a bunch of eggs and bacon, which of course would lead to a whole other problem
So how do you get enough protein without eating fat?
Well the only way you can is to include Whey protein. Whey protein is a powdered supplement that you can buy in any health food store and most super-markets.
All you have to do is either mix one scoop in with your cereal (it dissolves very easily) or just stir a scoop in a glass of water. Either way its the best way to get the protein you need at breakfast.
Dont focus on any one meal. All of your meals should be nutritionally well-balanced. Meaning they should contain protein, carbohydrates and some fat. Fat will help dramatically to keep your energy levels high.

If you’re dieting you need continually fuel your body throughout the entire day. This means a minimum of 4, but preferably 6 meals each and every day. This way you’ll have the energy to exercise properly and wont crave any large unhealthy meals.

Dont get caught up in the Fat-free food frenzy. Fat-free foods are very high in simple carbohydrates and will increase your insulin, which will Feed your fat cells making you fatter very quickly.

A good nutrition plan starts when youre making your grocery list. Then of course you have to stick to the list! Another good idea is to shop for your groceries just after youve eaten. This way you wont be tempted to fill up the cart with junk food.

Nutritionally poor food is fine in moderation. But dont over-do it. Take one day each week to satisfy your cravings. You wont eliminate all the good things youve done over the rest of the week. There’s little wrong with it and in fact itll help you stay on track.

If you try to eliminate your favorite junk food completely itll lead to binge eating in only a couple of weeks. Then youll have a lot of trouble getting back on track.

When it comes to meats chicken, tuna (and most other fish) and turkey are your best choices. Theyre lower in fat, which means theyre lower in calories as well and have less cholesterol.

But dont eliminate red meats. Theyre not only an excellent source of protein but also of
iron, zinc and creatine (which helps tremendously with fitness). So try to include a couple of meals each week that contain red meats.

Bananas, oranges, grapefruit, and other citrus fruits are the best fruits. They’re rich in vitamin C and potassium. Eat fruit and drink juices daily. But be aware fruits and fruit juices contain a lot of calories, so if youre trying to lose weight once a day is good enough.

Supplements are meant to supplement healthy eating, not compensate for poor eating habits. But if you arent getting the nutrients you need, for example youd need to drink a ton of milk plus take other calcium rich foods each day to get the calcium you need, then a calcium pill a day may be a good idea.

Exercise is not an option. Cardiovascular exercise and more importantly resistance exercise (weight lifting) is essential for good long-term health. Muscles will increase your metabolism making it possible to lose fat, and resistance exercise has amazing benefits for your heart and other organs.

A daily vitamin E may help protect against heart disease and cancer. Because people cannot easily get enough vitamin E in common foods, a supplement of 200 to 400 international units (IUs) per day is a wise health investment.

About the Author:

Phil Beckett is the author of The New Womens Guide To Successful Weight Loss & Fitness and the Fitness Director at Womens Health & Fitness Inc. Hes helped thousands of women succeed with their weight loss, health & fitness goals over the past 14 years. Visit http://www.womens-health-fitness.com to contact Phil with your questions.

About the Author

About the Author:

Phil Beckett is the author of The New Womens Guide To Successful Weight Loss & Fitness and the Fitness Director at Womens Health & Fitness Inc. Hes helped thousands of women succeed with their weight loss, health & fitness goals over the past 14 years. Visit http://www.womens-health-fitness.com to contact Phil with your questions.


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