Healthy Weight Loss Tips

Healthy Diet Tips And Much More



Staying Healthy on a Low Carbohydrate Diet

Staying Healthy on a Low Carbohydrate Diet
Marjorie Geiser

It is estimated that about 32 million Americans are following some type of low carbohydrate diet. This is the result of fad diet authors claiming that carbohydrates are the cause for Americas rising obesity problems. The backlash against carbohydrates is a result of the low fat craze that started in the 80s.When consumers started cutting down their fat intake, manufacturers figured out that they could create low fat processed food products that the public would buy. Because these products claimed to be fat free, Americans didnt pay attention to the fact that they were not also calorie free, and as a result, the total amount of daily calories has slowly been increasing. In fact, although the total percentage of calories from fat has decreased, the actual amount of fat intake has increased by 10# per year since 1975! The increase of carbohydrate has also increased, at a rate of 20# per year, mostly as a result of highly processed foods.

It is estimated that 3800 calories are now produced for every American man, woman and child. We have evolved from a world of feast or famine, but were in a state of perpetual feast, although our bodies have not changed. We have no defenses against excess calories: Every year, 300,000 to 400,000 deaths in the US are attributed to obesity.

Meanwhile, Asian and Middle Eastern populations consume 50-75% of their calories from rice and have some of the lowest rates of obesity and heart disease in the world. People living in the Mediterranean also have fewer health conditions commonly seen in the US. This diet consists of whole grains, vegetables, legumes, nuts and fruits. Their diets are rich in fish and low in meats and poultry. Although their fat intake is about the same as in America, the type of fat is primarily monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil, where Americans eat primarily saturated animal fats.

Regardless of the actual advantage or disadvange to following a low carbohydrate diet, there are three recommendations for maintaining good health while following such a diet. The first is to choose healthy fats over the unhealthy, saturated fats, when considering fat intake. Examples of healthy fats would be plant fats that have not been hydrogenated, which makes the fat more solid at room temperature. It is believed that hydrogenation is actually more harmful to health than saturated fats found naturally in animal products. Plant fats would include nuts, avocados, and olives. Oils such as olive oil, canola oil and peanut oil are better choices than fats that come from animal sources, such as butter, lard or bacon grease. Multiple studies over the years have shown that excess animal fats lead to higher risks of cancer, heart disease and other inflammatory disorders. Saturated fats have been linked to increased cholesterol, LDL (the bad) cholesterol as well as to increased LDL cholesterol oxidation. In fact, in January 2004, an Atkins representative put out a press release advising the public to decrease their amounts of steak, eggs, and saturated fast to less than 20% of their total fat intake.

The next recommendation to ensure good health is to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Although fruits and most vegetables are restricted in the initial phase of some low carbohydrate diets, they are then allowed back in limited amounts. The phytonutrients that come from a diet rich in fruits and vegetables have been shown to decrease blood pressure, as well as protect against cancer, heart disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. Its easy to add more fruits and vegetables to your diet, once you get in the habit. Examples are; add some berries to breakfast, eat a tomato at lunch, include broccoli with dinner, drink some vegetable juice with snacks, and have a large salad with your meal.

The final tip to ensure good health is to eat a diet of whole foods, rather than fall back on the easy snack, convenience foods of today. If Americans had just cut down their amount of fat intake in the 80s, without finding new ways to snack, we may not be seeing the epidemic of obesity we see, today. When people started going on the low carbohydrate diets, they eliminated a large number of calories by eliminating snacking, especially at night, where common snacks are chips, crackers, and other high fat, high refined carbohydrate foods, such as ice cream. Today, though, much like in the 80s, manufacturers are now developing low carb and low net carb snack foods. We can now find low net carb chips, crackers, ice cream, popcorn, even low carb pizza! As Americans start to increase their intake of these foods, we will soon see a slowing of the weight loss many had seen initially. In order to call themselves a low net carb food, manufacturers subtract the fiber and sugar alcohols from the total carbohydrates in the product, rather than produce products without carbohydrate. There is no actual FDA standard for what a low net carb food is, yet, though, so right now its anything the manufacturer wants to say it is. These foods also are very high in fat and saturated fat, usually through hydrogenation. So, not only will calories be added back into the diet through resuming unhealthy snack habits, but they will be calories consisting of high amounts of the unhealthy fats.

So, while following a low carbohydrate diet, in order to ensure continued good health, follow these three recommendations: 1) Make most fats you eat the healthy, plant fats, rather than eating a diet high in animal or hydrogenated fats, 2) Eat plenty of nutrient rich fruits and vegetables, which are high in disease-fighting antioxidants, and 3) eat mostly whole, fresh foods and very little processed snack foods, even if they say low carb, in order to avoid hidden and unnecessary fat and calories.

Marjorie Geiser has been teaching health, fitness and nutrition since 1982. She is a nutritionist, registered dietitian, certified personal trainer and life coach. As the owner of MEG Fitness, Marjories goal for her clients is to help them incorporate healthy eating and fitness into their busy lives. To order her 30-Day Health & Fitness Challenge e-course and learn more about Marjorie, go to her website at www.megfit.com or email her at Margie@megfit.com


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted by: admin | Category: Healthy Breakfast,Healthy Choice,Healthy Diet,Healthy Eating,Healthy Foods | Comments (0)

Stay Healthy With Exercise

Stay Healthy With Exercise
Michael Stefano

As a society, weve been more than convinced of the need for daily exercise. From the gimmicky hype of the television info-mercial, to the sound advice of the family physician, weve been bombarded with the reasons why we need to workout.

The medical community has coined the phrase, The Deadly Quartet, to describe four risk factors that plague Americans in disproportionate numbers:

The Deadly Quartet

Obesity

High blood pressure

High blood cholesterol, and triglyceride levels

Reduced sensitivity to insulin

Despite all this information thats been made available, overweight and out of shape Americans still huff and puff their way through their day. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that obesity alone results in over 300,000 preventable deaths in the United States every year.

More than 60 percent of all Americans are classified as overweight or obese, while at any given time 30 to 40 percent of all Americans are trying to get in shape. An even higher percentage of cardiovascular disease is related to obesity, and being overweight nearly doubles your chance of developing high blood pressure.

But hears the good news, an article published in the March 2001 issue of The Annals of Internal Medicine has revealed that thirty minutes of daily exercise can extend human life.

This elaborate study took place from 1984 to 1989 in Finland using 1300 middle-aged men. Upon follow-up in 1997, researchers recorded 124 total deaths from both cardio and non-cardiovascular causes. After making adjustments for other risk factors (such as age and smoking), low fitness levels were associated with an almost three times higher mortality rate.

Scientists have proven that twenty to thirty minutes of moderate physical activity per day, forestalls the onset of the deadly quartet, and thereby prevents chronic disease, while extending human life.

Following a sensible exercise program will bring about significant change in the bodys chemistry, and its ability to perform work efficiently. This training effect lowers blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, as well as increases insulin sensitivity, and thereby forestalling the onset of type II diabetes.

But besides these all-important health benefits, the right kind of exercise also burns fat, and sculpts our bodies into lean, high performance machines. Following a properly orchestrated workout program will not only add years to your life, it will add quality years that are reminiscent of youth, where youll look forward to the dawning of each fun-filled day.

About the Author

Michael Stefano is a 20-year veteran of FDNY, as well as author of The Firefighter’s Workout Book and creator of The Firefighter’s Workout Video.

His workout routines and articles have been featured on such internet giants as America Online, Yahoo! and eDiets.com.

Currently Michael is editor in chief at http://www.firefightersworkout.com, where you can get more information about his book and other services, as well as sign up for his FREE Train For Life Newsletter.


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted by: admin | Category: Healthy Diet | Comments (0)

Nutrition, Evolution, and Having a Healthy Diet

Nutrition, Evolution, and Having a Healthy Diet
Judith Schwader

Nutrition has everything to do with health. This isnt news, exactly, but looking around at the crazy information on the market, one wonders if anyone actually makes the connection: what you eat affects how you feel. Its that simple. Your health depends on the food choices you make in both the short and long term.

Take a pill, and all youve done is treat a symptom. Change your eating habits, and create a lasting change in your well-being. There are so many approaches to eating, however, and so much conflicting information that its come down to this simple question: does whatever youre eating right now make sense?

Well, sense isnt common, and it does depend on some good information. So here is something to consider: what kind of foods are humans evolved to eat? Cheetos? Dont think so. Thats a no-brainer, but what about some others that we counted as healthy staples until recently, like bread and pasta. Go way back in your imagination, to hunter gatherer days before agriculture and the obesity which followed for the first time among humans and consider what would be part of our ancestors normal diet. If youre about to pop something into your mouth that wasnt around before agriculture, (a relatively recent development in human history), then eat it knowing its not considered a normal food by your body. Foods your body considers normal contribute to your health, other foods are either neutral or harmful. How simple is that?

A well-known exploration of this concept that certain foods help our bodies thrive is Dr. Peter DAdamos book, Eat Right 4 Your Type, in which he bases his lists of what to eat and avoid on blood type. DAdamo asserts that type O is the oldest type, and the newer A type didnt show up on the scene until agriculture. So, Os should eat lots of meat and veg because that blood type doesnt know how to handle too much grain. Type As can eat grain, but not dairy. Dairy is a category reserved as a normal food only for the yet more recent human blood type, AB. (Maybe well evolve a new type that can handle Cheetos and red licorice, my personal favorite abnormal foods).

DAdamo supports his blood-type theory with all kinds of careful research, and so what? Does it make sense that humans should rely primarily on foods that occur naturally? Absolutely. If youre going to eat a grain like wheat then, eat it whole, or dont eat it at all, and dont eat much of it anyway because humans pretty much made wheat up! Im not going to take the, Does it occur naturally? debate too far, because its time to look at another researchers take on the food and evolution connection.

Dr. Phillip Lipetz wrote The Good Calorie Diet, a book for the weight loss market, but he also has supported his theories with all kinds of careful research. His describes how the human response to starvation that was developed during the ice age carries on today. Ironic, isnt it, that the food available to us today – rich and sweet and abundant – causes our bodies to behave as though starvation is at hand.

The short story for how this works is that up until the ice age, humans ate whatever was readily available, like roots, plants, fruit, and a little tasty carrion now and then. Along came the ice ages, and those foods became scarce. Now humans were forced to hunt, but it was dicey and the weapons were primitive, so spans of time occured between kills. The result: our ancestors evolved ways to make the most of the conversion of excess blood sugar into stored nutrition in the form of body fat. When they starved, they lived off stored fat.

Todays diet mimics the ice age diet: high fat and high protein, and our genetic programming says, Uh oh, were facing starvation again. Better store up some fat. Lipetz goes into convincing detail about food combinations in his book. He describes some that cause the creation of excess fat, such as butter on bread. More useful are his combinations that actually inhibit fat formation, like lean meat with most vegetables. In a society where obesity and its attendant health issues are rampant, these food combinations are helpful places to focus our attention. Yet the single most useful bit to remember from his research is that foods which cause our bodies to create excess fat all have one thing in common: they werent part of our ancestors normal diet.

Armed with this overview, next time youre about to pop something in your mouth – whether your focus is health or weight you dont need to have a bunch of rules and whacky information in mind. Just use common sense. Ask whether its a food that was around before the advent of agriculture. If it was, go for it. If it wasnt, then consider that your body wont consider the food normal, and in both the long and short run, thats got health consequences.

© 2004 Judith Schwader

Judith Schwader holds a Master’s degree in Education, and has written extensively on health. She has a background in social science and addressing chronic health conditions through nutrition and life style. Judith’s articles appear in: http://QandAHealth.com, and http://masteringyourtime.com.

This article may be reprinted in its entirety so long as this paragraph and the authors credits remain intact.


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted by: admin | Category: Healthy Choice,Healthy Diet,Healthy Eating,Healthy Foods | Comments (0)

Nutrition and healthy eating – What you should know

Nutrition and healthy eating – What you should know
John Gibb

Many people think that they can achieve a healthy lifestyle simply by maintaining a diet that prevents obesity. While keeping trim is one aspect of being nutritionally sound, there are many other factors that figure into getting your body working in the best possible shape.

Your body needs plenty of nutrients to stay in its best condition, and a diet simply isn’t enough. A combination of receiving nutrition and healthy eating can result in great things for your health. For instance, your body requires a daily amount of calcium. If you cannot achieve these daily guidelines, the calcium levels in your blood will drop. This will disrupt nerve communication and hinder blood clotting. If you neglect your calcium levels long enough, the bloodstream will begin to sap the very calcium that makes up your bones. This results in brittle bones, the onset of the dreaded osteoporosis.

Also, it’s important to get your daily vitamins. Vitamins A, B-complex, C, D, E, and K are all necessary on a daily basis to maintain your health. They contain antioxidants that help your body fight off the negative effects of free radicals – molecules that attack the cell membranes in your body. A lack of these vitamins can result in a range of symptoms, from things as simple as chapped lips to long-forgotten diseases such as scurvy, caused by a lack of vitamin C.

Of course, nutrition and healthy eating go hand in hand; while vitamins and minerals are required, it is also important to get the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Without enough protein, your body is unable to repair damaged tissues, or create new tissues. Carbohydrates are key in providing your body with the energy it needs for your day-to-day tasks. Fat is also important, as too low a fat level can be detrimental to the body.

Now that you have an idea of some of the nutrients daily, you need get off your butt and start exercising. Exercise will do wonders for your whole body, mind, and even spiritual state if pursued long enough.
About the Author

John Gibb manages http://www.nutritional-suplement-guides.com

The site dedicated to nutrition.


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted by: admin | Category: Healthy Diet,Healthy Eating | Comments (0)
Older Posts »
*/
© Healthy Weight Loss Tips | WP-Theme designed by ATILLUS
*/